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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
this past easter. muslim extremists in kenya and tanzania had pledged to attack churches on the holiday. the easter threats turned out to be empty, but christians in those countries have been under attack this year. gary lane has more from nairobi. >> reporter: militants tied to al-shabab made the threat against east african christians. the group calls itself "muslim renewal." father everest moshi was gunned down in sanzibar, and they may have been responsible for the killing of a somali pastor. they issued a statement following those killings "many more will die. we will burn homes and churches. we are not finished. at easter, prepare for disaster." dozens of churches have been attacked in tanzania. including the evangelical church in keonga. militant muslims burned the church february 19th, two days after the murder of catholic priest moshi. >> they took all of the blessing chairs that were here and placed them by the alter. they poured gasoline over them and set them on fire. they said it in public, it is no longer hidden, they don't want the christians. >> reporter: it wasn't the fi
-called war on terror more than a decade ago. >> still ahead -- ♪ cattle herders of tanzania are fighting the government for their land. plus, hospitals overwhelmed with the worst epidemic in years. more when we come back. >> hello again. the top stories on "al jazeera." at least 13 people have been killed in an explosion and damascus. this happened in the historic and commercial district of marjeh. a bangladesh court has ordered the confiscation of property belonging to the owner of the building that collapsed on wednesday. demonstrations outside the high court as the owner appeared. more than 380 people killed. queen beatrix has made way for theson and his wife to be first male monarch in more than 120 years. tribes in tanzania are resisting a government order to leave the ancestral land. the government says it needs grazing lands for a conservation site. >> this is, what is this one? his blood is in this land. his ancestors are buried here and he swears he will be, too. three years ago police burned his home to the ground. , he blames, a dubai-based company. >> are you happy that they
investment with a private sector. and let me tell you, i was in tanzania last week and saw many of the work that have been completed. those are very complex projects. they have been done on time. very want to prosper. we are created koss mers investment opportunities. these countries are creating -- for american companies to invest in those countries. they are great partners. they are the future. investment in those countries will also be able to help here at home american companies to create more jobs and they are our future. >> great. thank you very much. i yield. >> tom merino of pennsylvania. >> thank you, chairman. gentlemen, thanks for what you do. you are both extraordinary men. i appreciate that. doctor, if i could for a moment, as a prosecutor and handling cases, my theory was follow the money. it always ended up in convictions. could you explain to the taxpayers how specifically you follow the money to see how it is spent? because there is a perception out there that we wire millions of dollars over to the government into their account and we do not see it anymore. >> yeah. i very
a hand in rural tanzania, helped during the relocation of hundreds of lost boys in the sudan. hiked .appalachian trail, biked across the u.s., even conducted research in antarctica, conquering her fears but also running away. she was running away from the anger she felt towards her biological mother. and jane was by her side when she went in search of her birth mom. >> it was a wild experience. the three of us went to lunch. you know, me, white, privileged movie star. and this woman who's had a really rough life. she didn't seem to be angry. she didn't seem to be resentful. she has a good sense of rumor. i found out where mary gets her laugh. >> reporter: is it an overstatement to say jane fonda saved your life? >> it is not an overstatement at all. she doesn't know how amazing she has been and what she has done. >> reporter: for "nightline" i'm juju chang in hollywood, california. >> mary williams' book "the lost daughter" went on sale today. >>> now it's time for tonight's "closing argument." today, mother jones magazine released tapes of senator mitch mcconnell's campaign strateg
with kenya and tanzania, the first world trade center bombing through 9/11. what the last 12 years have given us is incredible human capital. incredible talent within organizations like the fbi and cia. incredible coordination between the federal government and state and local governments. what we have seen today wouldn't have happened in 2000. and the technology to pull it together. five years ago it could have occurred and we might not have had nearly the digital record that was developed in this case. one can only imagine had there not been the video and photographic evidence of the perpetrators. >> thank you. we are told the suspect suffering from at least one gunshot wound and blood loss. not known if they are fresh wounds from tonight's exchange of fire. he's being taken to mount auburn hospital in cambridge. the same hospital where transit police officer is recovering from a gunshot wound by either this kid or his older brother last night. this is a time to read a sad statement from the family of sean collier, the police officer killed last night on the m.i.t. campus. family has releas
was in tanzania last weekend i saw the work that has been completed. even by the ameran standards both are very complex projects. but you know what, they are being done on time and they want to prosper. there are investment opportunities because these countries are also creating the investment climate that is very conducive of the american companies so there are great partners and they are the future and the future. >> thank you very much. i yield. >> , of pennsylvania. >> gentlemen, thank you for what you do. you are withextraordinary men. i appreciate that. doctor come if i could for a moment, as a prosecutor handling cases my theory was follow the money. would you explain to the tax coverage house specifically you follow the money and see what is spent because there is a perception out there that we why are millions of dollars over to the government intotheir account and that material background i think it is very important. the united states when i started the amount of money that we provided to the foreign government was 9% of our total expenditures. that compares to all of our organizati
the case on the same day as the hearing. the doctor is serving 33 years. in tanzania the death toll of a building collapse to a 16 story building under construction when it crumbled. only 17 people were pulled out alive. finally, vatican city. pope francis visiting the tomb of st. peter, the church's first pope. the tomb is buried under the basilica. pope francis was the first pontiff to visit the site. >> time for some quick u.s. headlines. it was a major selling point of obamacare to provide a marketplace for fordable health insurance and their employees. but the obama administration delayed parts of that program until 2015. employers will now be limited to a single plan. fisker automotive getting more than $500 million from the obama administration and from you but that company hasn't made a single car since the month of july. to top it off, the green car company is in financial trouble and could soon file for bankruptcy. last week fisker furloughed 200 workers in the united states to try to save money. >> listen to this one. if you buy a bagel in new york, be prepared to pay mor
is to tell the stories of those who have lived in darkness. >> dana: this day was in tanzania. do you remember the girl singing the song to you. >> yes, i do. ♪ ♪ >> dana: you have this amazing look of love, care, and gratitude for them. >> yeah, i do. our trips to africa were -- opening and enabling women to have proper perspective. it stirs your heart because you want to help. i believe the human condition matters to the national security of the united states. i believe it's important to serve others. >> you have a letter in here to a big rock star. >> i do. bono, who became a pal. he was skeptical of me and frankly i was skeptical of him. we became pals because we shared a common desire to help others on the continent of africa. bono is the real deal. >> dana: had you a particular belief in freedom of the press. >> absolutely. >> dana: we didn't get the best press coverage necessarily. >> gosh, i don't know why you say that. [ laughter ] >> so you obviously remember that press conference in iraq the shoe throwing thing. [shouting] >> i'm the only one who got hurt in the whole t
who have lived in darkness. >> this was in tanzania. you remember the girl singing the song to you? >> yes, i do. >> united an amazing look of love, care and gratitude for them. >> yeah, i do. our trips to africa were eye opening and i was able to have it from a proper perspective. it hurts your heart because you want to help. the human condition matters to the national security of the united states. i believe it's important to serve others. >> you have a letter in here to a big rock star. >> i do. bono became a pal. he was skeptical of me and frankly i was skeptical of him. we became pals because we had a desire to help others. bono is the real deal. >> you had a particular belief in freedom of the press. >> absolutely. >> we didn't get the best press coverage. >> gosh i don't know why you say that. >> you remember the press conference in iraq? >> i am the only one who got hurt in the whole thing. but you were determined during that you were not going to end it without taking the questions from the reporters that were there. why was that so important to you? >> because i think in
've seen that just stays with you wherever you go. >> i will never forget, i was in tanzania, and it was just at the time that the compact had been agreed, and so we got to meet some of the people who were involved in putting together the compact. and what sticks in my mind, because i've seen actual highways that we've built, i've seen actual land titling centers that we have. but what sticks in your mind is the commitment of these people to the joint with venture of putting this project together. it's seeing that the governments are having to actually deal with hair citizens in a way -- with their citizens in a way that we very often take for granted in democracy. so that's my fondest memory, is meeting, actually, with the compact stakeholders who had helped put this together for a more than $800 million project for tanzania. >> before i go to the twitter questions, biggest challenge in on taping -- in getting to this objective, values plus interests equals roi? >> well, obviously, this is not a perfect science. even though we've tried to have metrics and to make it as scien
had one in kenya and one in tanzania. it's not infrequent if this was a planned, premeditated attack that it would be not only in boston. so the right thing to do from a preparation standpoint is to go to a heightened state of security until you can have a better sense of what the cause and what the motivation was. >> if you're just joining us, there were two explosions at the end of the boston marathon, around the 3:00 hour, two individuals according to the boston police dead, 28 injured. cnn political reporter peter can by is on the scene. that's copley square. peter, tell us what you're seeing. >> jaim, it's kind of haphazard now. the police are trying to shut down various roads that people are just sort of going around to get where they need to go. in the immediate vicinity where i am, at the corner of exeter and commonwealth just a few blocks north of copley square. the immediate blocks have been pretty handily cordoned off. you have a bunch of onlookers here. i'm looking at three fire trucks and a small group of police officers and first responders. there's lots of people milli
.n. in morocco and lent a hand in rural tanzania and helped lost boys in the sudan and hiked the appalachian trail and biked across the u.s. and conducted research in apartment arca conquering her fears but running away also. she was running away from the anger she felt towards her biological mother, and jane was by her side when she went in search of her. >> it was a wild experience. the three of us went to lunch and me, white, privileged, movie star and this woman who has had a really rough life. she didn't seem to be angry or she didn't seem to be resentful. she has a good sense of humor. i found out where mary gets her laugh. >> is it an overstatement to say jane fonda saved your life? >> it is not an overstatement at all. she doesn't know how amazing she has been and what she has done. >> reporter: for "good morning america," i'm juju chang in hollywood, california. >> what a fascinating and beautiful story. >>> now, sam has a final check on the weather. >> george, i just want to make sure if you come to times square to hang out with us on "good morning america," we want to get you on t
that i thought in the national park in tanzania and that the park superintendent maybe there was one other employee in the area, but he had the experience of coming over here and working in our park service and was very proud of that and was taking the best of practices inlet was a very difficult situation in the amount of support he had from his government and dealing with just all kinds of things. but this exchange was a win-win for conservation around the world come and it was for soft power from the united states because when people asked about his training and he was in the village and what he had displayed when he walked into his office was the best the united states has to offer and reaching out and building long sustainable relationships and friendships on a person-to-person level. at another place where i saw the park service, and this was actually our government learning from the park service was when the normandy interpretation center was opened. beautiful facility that how do you tell the story? and so, when when our international battlefield the greatest generation was t
from the united states. that after the embassy bombings in kenya and tanzania, there was not much of a response from the united states is that, is there the feeling the lack of response in this case could bring on trouble down the road? >> yes and there's a real frustration in a lot of the intelligence community, a lot of the military community that the benghazi attack has not seen anyone pay a price yet. for all of the talk they were going to see justice served and they were going to go after all of these people, that just hasn't happened. in fact, the people who have been suspected, we haven't really talked to and that, who have been held in different parts of the world, different countries, the u.s., as far as we know did not have access to and some were let go. so there's a frustration that has built up over time. catherine mentioned not being able to have access to any of the state department employees or cia employees who were on the ground. they're not being forthcoming. we heard from senator graham on "special report" a couple weeks ago that, you know, they have been told
. the first world trade center bombing in 1993, al qaeda attacks on american embassies 98 nya, tanzania and in and on the u.s.s. cole in 2011 and the dozen years since where all -- were all fueled by islamist hatred for the ugs and its values. their muslim organizations in this country such as the american islamic forum for democracy, headed by a consider, that speak out bravely against the totalitarian ideology. they receive no shoutout at presidential speeches, no outreach is extended to them. one of the tsarnaev sbrrs dow dead. the other might as well be. but if that isment the limit of our concern there will be others. michael mckasey is a great patriotic american. a brilliant american. and now we have those who have told us that we must pass gun control legislation that most of them even acknowledge would not have affected the horror at sandy hook at all. but they say you must pass gun control legislation for the benefit, for the -- in the memory of sandy hook, utilizing that horrible murder spree to try to justify their political agenda. my first question is, will the legislation
to develop the compact. liberia, morocco, sierra leone and tanzania. the requests also include funding for the pressure programs from guatemala and nepal to reform the policies and institutions that will move them closer to qualifying for contact. that's why the country's our home to over 100 million of the world's poorest people. they represent an opportunity for the poverty and advanced u.s. interests. these countries have taken concrete steps to reform the government and qualify for compact. this is what many call the mcc effect. the recent study of a government officials and the countries worldwide link the influence of the policy performance greater than any other external measurement system. the request for fiscal year 2014 wouldn't allow us to find contact with all five countries. so some would have to compete for future funding. it is important to note, however, that the affect depends on having sufficient resources to incentivize and sustain policy changes. if the funding is cut, that the fact is diminished. madame chair, with the committee's support, mcc and partner agencies
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)